Download Albert Camus as Political Thinker: Nihilisms and the by Samantha Novello PDF

By Samantha Novello

An excessive genealogical reconstruction of Camus's political considering hard the philosophical import of his writings as supplying another, aesthetic knowing of politics, political motion and freedom outdoors and opposed to the nihilistic different types of recent political philosophy and the modern politics of contempt and terrorisms

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Extra resources for Albert Camus as Political Thinker: Nihilisms and the Politics of Contempt

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Men who have broken their chains sail towards faraway islands, tasting the pungent skies and the vigorous splendour of the sea breeze. They do not look back, disdaining the cowardly wake that flees from the propeller and dies’) (I, p. 947; Camus 1980, p. 128; my italics). This passage strongly evokes Ecce homo, where the image of navigation is associated with Zarathustra’s ‘seekers’ (EH, ‘Pourquoi j’écris de si bons livres’, 3), the conquerors and discoverers of new lands and new values, who break with all that is behind them and embark on terrible 26 Albert Camus as Political Thinker seas.

Vers des îles lointaines voguent des hommes déchaînés […] (When will the audacious daybreak of my resolutions rise up for me ? When will I have the courage to no longer be a man? Men who have broken their chains sail toward faraway islands […]). (I, p. 947, my italics) Camus openly follows in the footsteps of Ecce homo, where the image of the dawn evokes the liberation from the straitjacket of rationalism that supports traditional morality and which announces a whole series of new mornings, or revaluations of all values (EH, ‘Pourquoi j’écris de si bons livres’ – ‘Aurore’, 1; ‘Pourquoi je suis un destin’, 1).

943), and confronted with the superhuman example of Zarathustra’s ‘conquerors’, the author suffers from his all too human weakness to live up to the Fool’s ‘divine’ word, namely, to break free from the oppressiveness of ratio (I, p. 943): Quand donc se lèvera pour moi l’aurore audacieuse de mes résolutions? Quand aurai-je le courage de ne plus être un homme ? Vers des îles lointaines voguent des hommes déchaînés […] (When will the audacious daybreak of my resolutions rise up for me ? When will I have the courage to no longer be a man?

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